The Gastropub Machine

A couple of weeks ago, I found myself in Fulham for an early evening midweek drinks date. Despite being born in southwest London, this corner of the west has eluded me until now. London is often like that. Its sprawl and the sheer scale of paralyzing choice makes it surprisingly easy to leave entire areas untouched for years – even parts that are relatively close to home. I met with my friend at a charming corner pub which has maintained the brass rail around the bar in the style of a proper old boozer, whilst adding chic and modern touches.

Bottles of water and glasses sat on each table. It’s great to see more British gastropubs cottoning on to this trend. One of my favorite things about the casual dining scene in the US is the fact that water is brought almost the second one sits down, before any alcoholic drinks are even ordered. This takes the pressure off; many a time have I tried in vain to catch the attention of waiting staff to chase up my forgotten order of a water jug. Since this gastropub was an order-at-the-bar affair, having the water already placed out was perfect.

As I glanced over the menu out of curiosity, it struck me that the gap between pub grub and fine dining – both in terms of quality and cost – is gradually narrowing. Nowadays, the price of a couple of courses in a gastropub scarcely comes in any cheaper than a meal with wine at an intimate and dimly-lit bistro, but to Gen X and Gen Y, that has never been the point. The casual, low-stress dining experience with minimal table service is beloved by many who find the white tablecloth stereotype stuffy and unnecessary. The same millennials that devoured piled-up Sunday lunches in eclectic pubs, sat at chipped wooden tables, now earn tidy city salaries – but their tastes haven’t really changed all that much. Gastropub quality in the UK has therefore dutifully grown with its audience, and it goes without saying that the prices have too.

It got me wondering how far the gastropub machine can go. There’s a uniformity to the model, and whilst each establishment might have a signature dish, sometimes reading menus can feel like déjà vu. The rate at which drinking holes receive swanky refurbs in conjunction with new menus has become quite prolific.

Sometimes, I like to remember a time when triple cooked chips weren’t so frequently found with a parmesan and truffle sprinkling. And every time a place I love edges towards the hot-smoked-salmon-brunch end of the spectrum, I worry that the charm which I first fell in love with could eventually end up vanishing for good. It happens more and more; I stumble into a favorite Victorian pub to find that their simple and affordable bar snacks menu has been replaced by a three course extravaganza, and not one single main on the menu will pair quite so well with my pint of Harvey’s Sussex Best as that scotch egg would have done.

The whole thing sometimes makes me want a packet of Scampi Fries, enjoyed at a slightly sticky table adjacent to a fruit machine. I suspect that there are no such places left in West London, but I’d be very happy to be proved wrong.

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