How a bad cask pint can lead to love

If you seek out the greatest beer lovers in any nation, they tend to be inquisitive and hungry for new experiences, especially tasty ones. Prominent beer industry figures frequently note that UK conventions which attract a global audience offer chances to overhear the conversations of American brewers and publicans excitedly discussing cask ale; where to drink it and what to drink. This eagerness to explore new things is to be expected of those with an established passion for great beer and the discovery of such. But are the US folks who are less entrenched in the world of beer as eager to get stuck in?

Sometimes the answer is still yes, but the possibility of a bad experience is higher for tourists than for anyone. When I first met my American husband, I winced as he reported having stumbled into a Nicholson’s pub and ordered a pint of London Glory in the West End on his first night in London. I could make a reasonable guess that it had been served flat, at the wrong temperature, and tasted of brown nothingness. Immediately my mind was racing with ideas of pubs that I could take him to for better cask ale experiences that would hopefully erase that newbie error of ill-fortune for good. Fortunately, he was willing to give cask another try, and loved it by the night’s end (it’s just as well; I’m not sure our relationship would have gotten off the ground had he not appreciated a good hand-pulled pint).

But what about the visitors to the UK who turn their backs on cask after a shoddy and lukewarm experience? How can we convince them to give cask another shot? The upcoming Cask 2019 event run by Affinity Brew Co could help. The participants will be breweries who don’t usually serve their beer in cask, and with trendy names like Beavertown and Pressure Drop already confirmed, it could be just the thing to convince skeptics that cask need not be bland and boring.

Maintaining the good parts of cask’s reputation whilst improving upon the bad parts is a tough PR gig, and is certainly not an overnight job. But together, we can keep the buzz going for this great British institution. And next time you overhear a bad pint ordered in an American accent, why not step in to humbly suggest an alternative? Your advice could even lead to the love of cask spreading a little further.